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mutually exclusive sets, use of => in notation?

mutually exclusive sets, use of => in notation?

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MutuallyExclusiveSets

If you click on link above, it will take you to a screen shot.
in the mutually exclusive sets video => is used as part of the notation towards the end of the video to say that the complement of A is not equal to B but that B => 13 which is a part of the A complement and 13 which is not a part of the B set.
Couple of things,

  • can we use <> to represent not equal to rather than equals which has been crossed through
  • why are we saying that the complement of A is less than or equal (=>) to 13 which is a part of the A complement and 13 which is not a part of the B set.

It doesn’t read right to me and the narrator of the video doesn’t reference it as part of the explanation?
Could you elaborate / explain for me please?

thanks

1 Answer

365 Team
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Hey Daniel, 
 
We’re using the crossed out equal sign (=\=) because it clearly depicts “not equal” and we don’t think “<>” is as universally recognized to have that meaning. 
 
As for the “=>” sign, we’re using it not in the sense of “greater than or equal to”, but as an implication. This means it’s equivalent to “therefore”. 
 
Best, 
365 Vik 

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